The High Line, Chelsea, NYC

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The High Line is a public park in NYC, built on the remains of an elevated train line that served the City's industrial sector.  The group that led its redevelopment has a quick timeline of interest as well as some historical photos.  

It's only a 1.5 mile walk, and even on a 42oF day, it was very popular.  I started on the north end, near the Hudson Yards, where the subway system gathers many of its cars.



Some sections, such as this, clearly point to its past usage.  The handrails are new and concrete has been added to level out the rail road tracks.  




The park runs from the rail area to the lower West Side of Manhattan, through Chelsea and the historical meatpacking district.  As far I can tell, it's all being converted tor residential properties at a frenetic pace.  The sign below, 507, shows that rent varies for a studio at $3,700 per month to a 2B unit for $6,200 to $8,400 per month. That said, somehow the area appears to be popular among 20-30 somethings.  A quick check for the per capita in Chelsea reveals $140,000 in income.  So, I guess that's doable, especially without car expenses and assuming no other debts.  Good luck, kids!  (The good news about living in NYC is that you can buy anything - you just have no place to put it.  Maybe that's why everyone eats out all the time.)



The below is 520 West 28th, a condo unit for those who would rather invest than pay rent.  Your 2BR can be had at $4.5M, but if you need some space, you can get up to a 5BR for $29.7M.  That said, you did get 6,800 sq.ft.  It's worth clicking the link above to see what it is you're getting.




Don't know what street this is (there's not a street sign on the walkway), but it's a nice safe way to take a picture down the middle of the road.


The London Terrace Gardens just struck me as a massive row house.  If you go the apartment rental site, you'll see a better street level photo and find that one 1BR is available for $4,300 per month.  I guess it's popular. 


 Andy Warhol has his eye on you.


The below are under construction and appear to be residential.  No, these are not pods for growing humans as seen in The Matrix.  These are pods for growing humans in Manhattan.  Heck, I don't know.  Good luck finding blinds or curtains, so people will be living in a bubble and watching people walk by.  Regardless, the window washers are going to charge triple.



The below just humored me.  At street level, you don't really think about what goes on on the roof.    The street level is vacant, but upstairs you have a all glass structure maybe for parties, a steel tank for water or grain or a chemical, a red metal building which says "cheap storage," and of course the open sided metal building to the rear with flying tarps, which says... mob business.  Look no further.  Keep walking.



Below is Selfie Central, where one can benefit from a naturally occurring breeze to sway one's hair or scarf, while getting a scenic backdrop of 10th Avenue.  It was very popular, with some bringing extra lighting for professional photography.  I'm sure the location is trending on Twitter now, get there while it's hot!


A friend pointed out that this bridge connects two Google offices, and it requires an executive pass to be able to use it.  So, there's that.  I was happy with this photo, obviously post-processed.


I guess this was a major junction.  Now it looks like an alien with long limbs... weird.


This is an interesting "framed" walkway.   There are a few other artist-y things along the path along with quite a number of benches.  Post-visit research reveals, pun intended, that this is The Standard, a hotel with glass floor to ceiling windows for that inner exhibitionist.  It's located directly across from an office building, so no telling what goes on there.  That said, there are curtains and the price is fairly cheap as NYC goes - ($160/nt presently). 



I believe the High Line has been extended, but I had other travels and called an end to this hike at the former National Biscuit Company and now Chelsea Market, described as a food hall, shopping mall, office building and television production facility.  I guess it had all that, and it's good to see old buildings being put to good use. I'd give it 5 Stars if only for the restroom cleanliness.










1 comment :

  1. There are some nice shots there. Glad you had fun on your visit!

    ReplyDelete