Urban Chestnut Brewing Company

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As a dinner plan with others didn’t work out, it was left to me to figure out where I wanted to eat.  A discussion with an “in-the-know” beer enthusiast at Schlafly suggested Urban Chestnut, if I had time, to check out their German beers and Schnitzel.  Two birds, one stone, in the form of dinner and another craft beer brewery.

So, I drove to their closer location, not a small place as it opens to either side of the building shown below, including a courtyard.

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But, they had a very limited menu.   No Schnitzel.  The employee had no reservations in sending my business to their other location, which was only a few miles away in “The Grove.”

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It’s a pretty colorful place, by appearances an eclectic revitalization of an old commercial district.  And, at one end, Urban Chestnut greets you.

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That’s a pretty big sign.  And it’s an omen for the facility’s overall size (75,000 sq.ft.).  The below picture doesn’t show the length of the place, though notably the central section is a pretty cool outdoor patio section.

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That patio might include the total seats available at many craft breweries, but not here, where many tables are set within.

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Just add more people:

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Oh, and there’s the bar:

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Yes, it was a slow night.

And, beside all that, I came for the food.

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With a side of “corn nuts.”    The sandwich was $10, and it was delicious.  Corn nuts?  Meh, maybe with more salt or sugar.

To be paired with this I chose the STLIPA, short for St. Louis India Pale Ale.  This was a fine drink, an Imperial, with 8% alcohol volume.  I remembered to take a photo before I finished it, even.  I have a few beers that I favor over this in the style, but this still at the upper end.

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Below is the Triskel, An American single hop IPA, with French hops.

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This was interesting, but not nearly as good as the STLIPA.  Revisiting a week later, I tried the Aramis, from the French hops for which it is named, not to mention the possible Alexandre Dumas influence.  An interesting and pleasant beer, but I prefer more bitterness.

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Below is the Hopfen, described as a Bavarian IPA, brewed with a variety of Hallertau ‘hopfen’ hops (German), instead of the more usual and more citric hop varieties of most American IPA’s.

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As a result, it had a unique (to my experience) and enjoyable hops flavor.

The brewery, which opened earlier this year, will be able to produce up to 100,000 barrels a year, plus approx. 40,000 at their other location.

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This brewery is intended to feature their “Revolution” series of beers, suited to their American beers.  The original location will produce their “Reverence” themed German/European beers, as well as test beers, though beers from both will be available at either.

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Tours aren’t offered as yet, but they do offer a self-guided tour, which I thought was pretty clever.  This wouldn’t work in most breweries, but it does here because of the scale.

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Urban Chestnut has a lot of beers to offer, but I only sampled the one.  Usually, it would be the beer that would bring me back.  Here, I’d come for the schnitzel, but plan more time to sample their beers.

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Overall, it’s a very worthy stop for craft beer seekers.

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